Kevon Edmonds
Derrick Dunn

Derrick Dunn

Second Listen Sunday: Kevon Edmonds 24/7

Kevon Edmonds, 1/3 of legendary R&B trio After 7, was already a household name when he released his solo debut 24/7 in the fall of 1999. I was a senior in high school and living in El Paso, Texas when Kevon broke through with his solo single “24/7”. Working with writers Angelo Ray / David Scott, Edmonds did not stray that far from the After 7 formula, which was smooth vocal harmony and heartfelt lyrics.

Edmonds’s next single, “No Love (I’m Not Used to),” arrived from the pen of Daryl Simmons and showcased his vocals over a song that anyone who ever got too comfortable in a relationship can relate to. We have all been there where we take someone for granted and when we lose them, it’s hell on your heart. I am a firm believer that sometimes you have to learn to be alone to prepare yourself for the right person. 

For the last single, Kevon linked up with his brother Babyface for the beautiful ballad “Love Will Be Waiting at Home.” Marc Harris and Tommy Sims also provided their talents to the song. The opening song “Never Love You” is another Babyface written gem that could serve as a sequel to “No Love (I’m Not Used to)” with the pleading Kevon is doing to get his girl back. Quite honestly, “Never Love You” is a better song than some albums coming out today. Kevon could have easily relied on his younger brother for every song on the CD. While Babyface does provide his usual trademark to songs like “A Girl Like You” and “How Often,” Kevon has excellent chemistry with the other producers on the album as well.

Tim & Bob provide Kevon with two up-tempo bangers in “When I’m With You” and “I Want You”, while Gregory Curtis contributes the lush “Sensitive Mood.” 24/7 does lose a bit of steam towards the album’s end as the last few songs come across as filler. Nevertheless, this was a strong debut overall that I often revisit.

Final Grade: B+

Top Tracks: The singles and “Never Love You.”

24/7 is available on all streaming platforms

Movie Clappers

More reviews to explorer

Dru Hill, InDruPendence Day

Second Listen Sunday: Dru Hill, InDruPendence Day

Following the lukewarm response to Sisqo’s second album in 2001, Dru Hill returned with a new member Scola in 2002 for the vastly underpromoted Dru World Order. The group would spend the next eight years touring and eventually add new member Tao for its fourth album InDRUpendence Day this week’s Second Listen Sunday pick.

Delegation, Oh Honey

Slow Jam Saturday: Delegation, Oh Honey

One of the best things about growing up in the nineties was experiencing the joy of a Bad Boy remix. The label’s female R&B trio Total was enjoying the success of their song “Kissing You” when Puff dropped the remix in the late fall of 1995. The remix h carried the subtitle Oh Honey and was smoother than the original version.

Jason Weaver, Love Ambition

Second Listen Sunday: Jason Weaver, Love Ambition

Actors releasing musical albums has been a norm for as long as I can remember. While many like Jamie Foxx find success, others (who shall remain nameless) aren’t so lucky. One such talent was Jason Weave, who released his debut in 1994 on Motown records.

Facebook
Twitter
LinkedIn

© Copyright Reviews & Dunn. All rights reserved

website designed by Red Robin Digital designers