Album Review _ Gary “Lil G” Jenkins, The Other Side
Derrick Dunn

Derrick Dunn

Throwback Tuesday Album Review : Gary “Lil G” Jenkins, The Other Side

Gary Jenkins, better known as “Lil G” of legendary R&B group Silk, released his solo debut, The Other Side, in July of 2005. During time I served my county as a member of the United States Air Force while stationed in the United Kingdom. I had no idea that “Lil G” released a solo album, but I made sure to track the album down and pay the extra costs to have it shipped to me once I found out.

The singer opens up the album with the confessional “The Interview,” where he goes into why he departed the group Silk. Jenkins never takes shots at his other group members but instead wants the world to know he can do more than sing about sex. Jenkins than Segway’s into the southern juke joint flavored “The Other Side” and “Friday Night,” both of which re surefire steppers anthems. Jenkins also dabbles in jazz on “Everybody Dreams,” which I could see flipped into a gospel song.

Fans of the slow jam will be pleased with “The Sound,” “So Sexy,” and “Loving You,” which G sings with ease and avoids trying to repeat the signature Silk sound. My favorite song on the project would have to be Jenkins’s cover of Sam Cooke’s “Change Gone Come,” where he takes us to church and does the legendary Cooke justice.

Gary Jenkins is multi-talented in numerous entertainment avenues. The Other Side eloquently showcases the facets of Lil G. If you are expecting a rehash of Silk, then you may be disappointed. However, if you want some grown man R&B, I highly recommend The Other Side.

Final Grade: B

Top Tracks: “Change Gone Come,” “The Sound,” “So Sexy,” and “Loving You”

The Other Side is available on all streaming platforms.

Movie Clappers

More reviews to explorer

Album Review : Portrait, Portrait

Flashback Friday Album Review : Portrait, Portrait

One of the most extraordinary things about growing up in the nineties was the music. R&B groups were all the rage and I want to take you all back to 1992 when a vocal quartet by the name of Portrait released their self–titled debut, via Capital records.

Robin Thicke, Take Me Higher

Single Review: Robin Thicke, Take Me Higher

Robin Thicke has successfully spent the last few years rebranding himself after a messy public divorce from his first wife and his album Paula’s lukewarm response. In terms of albums, the singer hasn’t released a full-length project in over six years.

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on google
Google+
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

© Copyright Reviews & Dunn. All rights reserved

website designed by Red Robin Digital designers