Fear Street Part 3: 1666
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Derrick Dunn

Fear Street Part 3: 1666 narrowly avoids the pitfalls of other threequels

The final chapter of Netflix’s horror event arrives in Fear Street Part 3: 1666. Leigh Janiak returns to the director’s chair for the third film and writes the script with Phil Graziadei and Kate Trefry. Picking up almost immediately after the ending of the previous installment, Fear Street Part 3: 1666 opens with Deena’s nose bleeding. Our heroine sees a vision where she is in 1666 as Sarah Fier. I had mixed feelings about the premise of the third film, which explores the origins of Sarah Fier’s curse. I am not the biggest fan of period-piece horror films. However, having seen the first two installments of Fear Street, I had to know how the trilogy would culminate.

For the first forty minutes or so, Fear Street Part 3: 1666 does drag a bit. However, upon further reflection, I realized what the filmmakers were going for. There are subtle hints throughout the film that ties 1666 together with 1994. The filmmakers accomplish this feat by having some of the actors who made an appearance in the first part of the trilogy return for the threequel playing different characters. Here is the kicker, though; they portray the incarnate and ancestorial versions of their 1994 character. Therefore, be sure to pay close attention to those little details.

Kiana Madeira is still the captain of the ship in the role of Sarah Fier/Deena Johnson. Madeira has impressed me for all three films, with her acting as a strong final girl might be her niche. The actress is the bright spot of the Fear Street Part 3: 1666 as no one else stood out. Benjamin Flores Jr., who was my favorite character in Part 1, serves as a glorified extra for the portion of the film set in 1666. Furthermore, the whole angle of a colony gripped by a hysterical witch-hunt that has deadly consequences for centuries to come goes on for far too long. We have seen it all before, and yes, while I know the plot needed it for the story to come full circle, I think a ½ hour intro would have been just fine and less mundane.

Thankfully, once the curse’s origins receive their reveal and the film returns us to 1994 to wrap everything up, Fear Street Part 3: 1666 regains its footing. The always-delightful Gillian Jacobs gets a chance to shine as her character of Ziggy comes full circle. In contrast, Darrell Britt-Gibson’s character of Martin finally gets a chance to shine and add a bit of substance to the story. It is a shame that Darrell Britt-Gibson did not have more to do in the previous two films, as he has natural comedic timing.

Most film scholars will argue that trilogies suffer the most when there is no need for a third film. Given that, the production team of Fear Street had a cohesive story in mind, and the finale’ of the trilogy works. However, given the expansive titles in the Fear Street catalog and themes, Netflix does not need to make any more movies, in my opinion. Instead, an anthology series that explores the lives of Shadysiders forever is the best route to go.

Narrowly avoiding the threequel curse, Fear Street Part 3: 1666 is a nice close to the trilogy and worth watching.

Final Grade: C+

Fear Street Part 3: 1666 is available to stream now on Netflix.

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