Agent Game
Derrick Dunn

Derrick Dunn

Agent Game is a tepid spy thriller

From Saban films, espionage, fisticuffs, and gunplay fill director Grant S. Johnson’s latest directorial effort, Agent Game. Harris (Dermot Mulroney), a CIA interrogator at an Agency black site, finds himself the target of a rendition operation after being scapegoated for an interrogation gone horribly wrong. As the team tasked to bring Harris in begins to question their orders — and each other —Olsen (Mel Gibson), a senior intelligence officer, and his subordinate, Visser (Annie Ilonzeh), raise the stakes. Now, it is up to Harris and some newfound allies to uncover the truth and turn the tables.

I find it quite remarkable that a genre film like this is not wholly impossible to watch. As someone who has recently seen many cheap modern genre films, I can say that this is not one of the worst attempts. I would not say that the movie is excellent, but at least it is watchable.

These kinds of films are incredibly confusing and difficult to follow most of the time. The script is not confusing because it is so strong and cleverly written, but instead because it is so simple that the filmmakers have no idea how to tell it accurately and keep it interesting without stretching the story too much.

Due to this, the film has meaningless scenes in which characters talk intensely and harshly. You are not even sure who the bad guys are or what they want. Therefore, in that sense, “Agent Game” is no different from the average genre film, but it does have the advantage of being quite an entertaining film to watch.

There is a pleasant pace to the movie, and it looks well made. Despite the confusing story, the camera work and editing are excellent, and the directing. I am sure Grant S. Johnson could make a great action movie with a more robust script. In addition to the engaging pace, style, and entertainment found in this film.

This is another film where Mel Gibson plays a minor role. In this case, he also understands how to add something. His character is significant to the story, and he knows how to be present quite a lot, which is certainly welcome. His presence and acting take the film to a slightly higher level, whereas most other actors achieve something less impressive. However, many other well-known actors in minor roles often add something, like Jason Isaacs and Dermot Mulroney.

However, not as the main character. It is difficult to say who should have been the main character in this film and the characters are not very well written. The dialogues are weak, and the film fails to make anyone enjoyable. They are also all characters you do not get to know during the movie.

The film is quite okay to watch for the fan of modern cheap B-action movies, but everyone else would do better to skip this one. The story is too weak, and the characters are not fun or exciting enough. However, the action and its pace still keep the film reasonably entertaining.

Final Grade: C

Agent Game is available to stream now

Movie Clappers

More reviews to explorer

Facebook
Twitter
LinkedIn
Rose Blood

Rose Blood is superior Friday The 13th fan film

Friday The 13th superfan Peter Anthony makes his directorial debut in Rose Blood: A Friday the 13th Fan film. It wasn’t until I saw Jeremy Brown’s Vengeance A Friday The 13th Fan Film a few years ago that I started taking fan films seriously.

She Said

She Said deservers an audience in the comfort of your own

A life-changing historical moment comes to the big screen in She Said from Universal Pictures. Maria Schrader directs the film from a screenplay by Rebecca Lenkiewicz. The script adapts the 2019 nonfiction book She Said: Breaking the Sexual Harassment Story That Helped Ignite a Movement by Jodi Kantor and Megan Twohey.

High Heat

Typical action fuels High Heat

Director Zach Golden transitions to the action genre for his sophomore feature, High Heat, from Saban Films. Screenwriter James Pedersen makes his debut with the film. Former KGB operative Ana (Kurylenko) has left that life behind and turned chef.